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Author Topic: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges  (Read 18285 times)

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Offline Haljackey

Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« on: November 26, 2011, 03:03:16 PM »
Section 2: Partial Cloverleaf (Parclo) Interchanges
     

The term Parclo means partial cloverleaf, which is essentially what this interchange type is.  It's pretty much a cloverleaf interchange, but with two of the loop ramps removed, eliminating any weaving all-together. The empty space where the removed loop ramps should be allow room for long acceleration/deceleration lanes and can straighten and elongate the outer ramps, greatly improving flow and safety features. 

The award-winning Parclo interchange has been well received, and is now used all over the world.  Parclos are difficult to construct for a ground/elevated highway in SC4, but the RHW is able to take advantage of this great interchange type.

2.1: Parclo A-2 Interchange
2.2: Parclo A-4 Interchange
2.3: Tight Parclo A-4 Interchange
2.4: Parclo A-4 Interchange with dual acceleration/deceleration ramps
2.5: Parclo A-4 Interchange with single acceleration/deceleration ramps
2.6: Realistic Parclo A-4 Interchange
2.7: Realistic Parclo AB Interchange
2.8: Semi-Realistic Tight Parclo A-4 Interchange


Back to the Table of Contents
« Last Edit: October 20, 2013, 01:11:53 PM by Haljackey »

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2012, 10:56:19 PM »
Section 2.1:  The Parclo A-2 interchange. (Created by Haljackey)

The parclo A-2 is a interchange type consisting of 4 ramps, and is ideal to use in both rural and suburban areas.  Loop ramps are used to connect the arterial road to the highway, and long, straight ramps connect the highway to the arterial road, allowing for a smooth deceleration in speed off the highway instead of breaking to use the loop ramps.
-The parclo A-2 is designed to be easily upgraded to a Parclo A-4, which I will explain in a future guide.



Since I used the RHW-4 for all the diamond interchange guides, I'll do something different and use the RHW-6C for this guide. 

Getting the basic stuff out of the way...

Place your starter piece...


Drag the RHW using the RHW tool...


(Optional) Delete the starter pieces to create a RHW without any overrides.


And drag the stable network over it.


That's what a RHW-6C looks like.  Neat eh?



Parclo A-2 Interchange

First thing's first, construct your overpass:


Next, place your RHW-6C type "B" ramps like so:


And then extend the MIS ramps to loop around and intersect with the road:


The next thing that needs to be done is to draw RHW-2s next to the loop ramps you made.


Now place some more RHW-6C type "B" ramps to connect with the RHW-2s, changing them into the MIS.


...And there you go!  A parclo A-2 interchange!



Other combinations

Unlike diamonds, the parclo A-2 interchanges follow a standard design and thus are not as diverse.  The concept will remain the same for all variations.  However, I will show you some ways to diversify them, by changing the way they intersect with the road.

The easiest thing you can do is replace the last few tiles of the offramps with one-way roads before the intersection.  This will create an extra lane so exiting traffic now has right and left turning lanes.


You can also use the RHW-2/MIS splitter piece to make the ramps join together.


And you can also create turning lanes and traffic lights by replacing the last tile of the RHW-2 with a road.




Anyways, that will do it for the Parclo A-2.  There are many more parclo interchanges to come!

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2012, 10:58:03 PM »
Section 2.2:  The Parclo A-4 interchange. (Created by Haljackey)

The parclo A-4 is a interchange type consisting of 6 ramps, and is ideal to use in both urban and suburban areas.  Dedicated ramps are used to connect the arterial road to the highway for each direction, and long, straight ramps connect the highway to the arterial road, allowing for a smooth deceleration in speed off the highway instead of breaking to use the loop ramps.
-The parclo A-2 is designed to be easily upgraded to a Parclo A-4, which is done frequently in real life.

This interchange is among the safest designs in the world, and one of the most economical to construct.   Invented in the 1970s, this interchange type is still being constructed on new highways today all over the world.

This interchange also looks fantastic in SC4, and is easy to construct.  How easy?  You'll see as I show a few ways to make one in this guide.



Let's mix it up a bit.  The Parclo A-4 is designed for urban and subrban use, so lets build a massive RHW-10 with a one tile median to display it!

Getting the basic stuff out of the way...

Place your starter pieces...


Drag the RHW using the RHW tool...


(Optional) Delete the starter pieces to create a RHW without any overrides.


And drag the stable network over it.


That's the RHW-10.  What a beast!



Parclo A-4 Interchange

The Parclo A-4 follows a very similar construction process compared to the Parclo A-2, but with some minor extensions which make it larger, safer, and of higher capacity.

Firstly, lets start by constructing your overpass.


Then, like the Parclo A-2, add entering RHW-10 type "B" ramps at the edge of the overpass like so:


Then just loop the MIS to connect with the avenue to complete the loop ramps.


Next, its time to make the offramps.  Extend the RHW-2, following the loop ramps you just constructed.


Then place the RHW-10 type "B" ramps at the edge of the RHW-2.


Now all you have to do is connect everything together.




There.  If you finished at this point, you'd have another complete Parclo A-2 interchange.  But we're not done yet, we gotta make it in to a Parclo A-4!

For the final two ramps, there are a number of locations where it can go.  Some perfer to place the entrance at/before the offramp intersections along the avenue, others want to save space and put it as close as possible.  I will show both examples in this guide.



Setup 1:  Standard

Extend the MIS leading from the offramp and angle it towards the highway like so:


Then just plop another two RHW-10 type "B" ramps to finish everything up!




Setup 2:  Space-Saver

-At the edge of the overpass, drag another pair of RHW-2s like so:


Then, add some more RHW-10 type "B" ramps at the edge.


Then just connect everything up!


That's a space-saving Parclo A-4!



Other Intersections

Here, I will show you some other intersection types you can make for the Parclo A-4.  There's really no guide to follow, just use your mind to create whatever you desire!

Using one-way roads to create signaled intersection as well as direct on-ramps to the RHW.


The same junction, but used with avenue intersections instead to create two full intersections.
« Last Edit: May 07, 2012, 11:00:38 PM by Haljackey »

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2012, 11:00:18 PM »
Section 2.3:  Tight Parclo A-4 Interchange (Created by Haljackey)

Constructing the Parclo A-4 interchange smaller is possible, but the construction method is unlike anything I've displayed in this guide before.  That is why I have split this up into a separate post, but will still follow in the Parclo-A4 interchange guide for organizational purposes. 

We're going to start like this.  Place your avenue within 1 tile of the RHW-10, and plop a pair of RHW-10 type "A" ramps like so:


Then you are to immediately create a tight loop ramp exactly as displayed. 
-Do not curve the MIS until it has completely finished crossing the avenue or else you will not be able to construct an overpass.


Now, carefully construct your overpass.  Make sure your ave-over-MIS puzzle pieces match correctly or the interchange will not work.


With that done its now time to construct the offramps.  Just like outlined in the last post, construct a RHW-2 that follows the loop ramps you made.


Then place RHW-10 type "B" ramps at the edges.


And connect everything up.


All right, you now technically have a tight Parclo A-2 interchange.  Lets go and complete it.



As I already showed you two different ways to construct the final two ramps in the last post, I'll use the space-saver design only to keep this guide shorter in length.

At the edge of the overpass, of the existing onramps, construct two more RHW-10 type "B" ramps.


The last step involves simply dragging the MIS from the ramps to the avenue.


And there you have it!  A tight Parclo A-4 interchange!



Anyways, I hope this guide helps you out in one way or another.

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2012, 11:01:44 PM »
Section 2.4: Parclo A-4 Interchange with dual acceleration/deceleration ramps. (Created by Haljackey)

Now we're moving into realism.  One of the biggest things that sets the RHW apart from the ground/elevated highways of SC4 is the ability to make proper entrances and exits, something we had no control over with Maxis.  The ramps were painfully short and totally unrealistic, without any accel/decel space at all before it merges with the main carriageway.

RHW ramp type "C" corrects this issue, enabling you, the user, to make a new lane when a ramp enters the highway, extending it for realistic accel/decel lanes or adding a whole new lane altogether.

Going by real world standards, accel/decel lanes should be at least 100 meters long.  Some older routes that have not been reconstructed may have very little merge room similar to the Maxis highways, which can also compare to the merge room on the type "A" and "B" ramps of the RHW.  The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) suggests that these ramps should be 300 meters long, but some exceed 400 meters in length to increase roadway safety where there's ample room to do so.

Since a tile in SC4 is 16x16 meters, anything between 5-9 tiles should make for a good acceleration/deceleration ramp (not including room in puzzle pieces).  I'll take the average of the two numbers and make the accel/decel lanes 7 tiles long in this guide.



When you're making an interchange with accel/decel lanes, its pretty much a jigsaw puzzle.  You won't need to worry about starter pieces or dragging RHWs this time, you start by plopping two RHW ramp type "C" puzzle pieces.  I left a two tile gap between them for an avenue overpass as well as a 1 tile median for this guide.


Now you can start dragging the RHW from the puzzle pieces.  Don't worry about the ramps for now.


The next best thing to do is get your overpass up so you don't have to worry about it later.


Now its time to join your ramps with your avenue in a typical parclo style.  Start to construct your offramps as well by dragging a pair of RHW-2s from the avenue toward the RHW.  Place a pair of type "C" ramps at the terminus.
-You'll notice a textural glitch when you plop the ramp pieces.  This can easily be fixed by redrawing the network.


Now hook up your offramps with the type "C" piece to override the RHW-2 into a MIS ramp.  Drag the RHW tool over the deformed RHW-6 to change it back to a RHW-4.


Time for the last pair of ramps.  Start dragging a RHW-2 on the outside of the intersections.


Get yourself prepared by plopping two more RHW type "C" ramps further out.


Now just hook everything up!  Plop a pair of RHW-6S to RHW-4 transitions just next to your new onramps for a proper transition.  It works out to be exactly 7 tiles long.


Plop similar transitions on the outsides of the interchanges as well.  I'd suggest 7 tiles long on these to match the length of your loop ramps to make it look more uniform.


...And you're done!  Here's a look at the finished product zoomed out:




Like all RHW interchanges, you can further customize your creation.  Here are a couple examples.

Give your offramp a more realistic appearance by converting it to a one-way road when it comes out of the curve.  This will also establish a pair of lights on the intersections.


If you're looking to save space, move your outermost on-ramps to the inside of the intersection.  Although this isn't as realistic and will add to traffic congestion, its a good way to spare some extra tiles for something else.


Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2012, 11:02:52 PM »
Section 2.5: Parclo A-4 Interchange with single acceleration/deceleration ramps. (Created by Haljackey)

This guide will be similar to 2.4 (the last one), with a twist.  Instead of having two ramps feeding traffic to the highway, there will just be one.  You might think to yourself this may save some space, when it is actually more space consuming than the dual-ramp setting.  The advantage of this setup is to make entering traffic more organized and contained, as well as allowing for proper merge lengths, essential for creating these realistic interchanges.

Like the last guide, I will make the accel/decel lanes 7 tiles long in this guide (per lane).



This time round its best to make yourself a RHW beforehand so everything can fit perfectly in place.

Since this is an elementary step, I'll show how to make it once more, taken from the first guide.

Quote
Place your starter pieces...


Drag the RHW using the RHW tool...


(Optional) Delete the starter pieces to create a RHW without any overrides.


And drag the stable network over it.



Now that you have a RHW, its time to build the interchange.  Start like so.  Construct part of your overpass as well as the MIS splitters as displayed, at least 3 tiles away from the overpass.
-Make sure you select the RHW-4 splitter and not the RHW-2 splitter.  You'll have 2-way traffic if you do that which is not what we want here.


Start by making your ramps first.  The example shown is the most compact you can build.


With your ramps in place, its time to finish building the overpass.


Now start getting your off-ramps ready.  Drag a RHW-2 from the avenue until you reach the RHW as shown.


Plop a type "C" ramp on the RHW at the edge of the RHW-2.
-You'll see a flawed RHW-6S as a result of plopping the type "C" ramp.  This is known.


Drag the stub from the ramp on your RHW-2 to establish an override.
-Also, redraw the highway from the offramp toward the overpass to restore it to a RHW-4.




Once you reach this point, you might want to consider what you want to do with your off-ramp.  Do you want it to be higher capacity?  If so you can convert the MIS to a one-way road for the intersection.


Or even better, you can widen the ramp all-together.  In this image I replaced the type "C" ramp with a RHW-6S/dual RHW-4 transition and dragged the RHW up to the edge of the intersection, joining it with a one-way road.




Getting back to making the interchange, its time to join our on-ramp to the main highway.  There are actually two ways you can do this, and I will show both.

The first way you can do it is to plop a RHW-8/dual RHW-4 puzzle picece, making both onramp lanes reach the highway.


Here's a shot of the setup away from the centre of the interchange.


Then just evenly apply your RHW-8/6S and RHW-6S/RHW-4 transition along the roadway.  This example is shown with a 7 tile transition per lane.
-Do the same with your off-ramp, which just requires the RHW-6S/RHW-4 transition.  It's best to make it 7 tiles long as well to make it match the length of your other transitions.




The second way you can do this is to allow the joining lanes transition to one before it reaches the highway.  This is a more realistic transition.

Drag your RHW-4 from the MIS splitter for 7 tiles, then apply the RHW-4/MIS transition.  Join the ramp to the highway using the RHW-6S/dual RHW-4 transition and drag for another 7 tiles.
-Don't forget to apply the RHW-6S/RHW-4 transition for your off-ramp!  It's best to make it 7 tiles long as well to make it match the length of your other transitions.


...And you're done!  In this zoom out you will see the first on-ramp configuration used in the north and the second configuration in the south for comparison.




Here's a few modifications to the interchange you can make.

In this image, I moved the outermost on-ramp connections to the avenue to the other side of the intersections.  This will improve traffic flow and reduce congestion.


Here, I've extended the loop ramps by one tile, making them look more realistic.


Lastly, I used one-way roads to connect the outermost on-ramps to the avenue, which resembles an off-ramp.
-You could also convert this part of the avenue to a RHW-4 and use a type "A" ramp to connect the MIS.




Anyways, that will do it.  I hope you found this guide useful!

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2012, 11:03:50 PM »
Section 2.6: Realistic Parclo A-4 Interchange (Created by Haljackey)

The first tutorial in this guide since RHW 5.0's release will show you how to make a realistic parclo interchange. 5.0 has really upped the ante realism-wise, and this guide is geared to reflect that. There has never been a better time to construct realistic-looking interchanges in Simcity 4.

You will need hole digging lots for this guide. Using a slope mod is highly recommended as well.



Let's start out simple. Drag some RHW. Make sure you delete the starter pieces.
-For this guide, I am using RHW-4 with a 1 tile median. Your RHW network can be whatever size you want it to be with whatever median you want.


Get the ground lifters from the hole digging lots to do their stuff. Place 1 tile away from the RHW on each side. Drag road to set up the slope.


Demolish everything and place road stubs on your new hills.


Time to create your approach. Create a gradual assent to the top of the hills where the overpass will go. I highly recommend getting an aggressive slope mod like the RHW slope mod when you're building realistic interchanges. (I am using the bullet train slope mod here.)


Demolish your work once again and place road stubs or drag road for one tile on either side of your RHW like so. This will be the last step in setting up your approaches and will give you an extra tile below, useful for things like accel/decel lanes or future RHW widening.


Plop your avenue on-slope transitions.


Drag your avenue. At the same time, drag a couple more avenues to the side like so to set up the proper grade for your loop ramps.


Demolish the parallel networks. Plop a pair of Avenue-MIS type B ramps in a mirrored fashion.
-These pieces are new to RHW 5.0 and will drastically improve the ascetic appeal of your interchanges!


Drag MIS from the stubs and begin to curve them.


Demolish your MIS, including the stubs created by the Avenue-MIS pieces.


Plop a pair of MIS outer curves like so. Don't worry about them not connecting to the avenue-MIS ramps. That will be fixed later.


Keep curving by dragging RHW-2 from the curves. This will properly grade the next curve.


Demolish all the RHW-2 except for 1 tile near the curves. The next step is to plop a pair of 90 degree outer MIS curves directly next to the curves you just built. See the loop starting to form?


Two more MIS outer curves need to be plopped.


Connect your loop to the RHW via any ramp piece you want. I am using a RHW-4 type B ramp for simplicity's sake.
-There is room in this design for acceleration/deceleration lanes if you want to build some.


To finish the loops, carefully add in diagonal MIS filler pieces where the RHW-2 stubs are. Make sure the lines match up to form a working connection.


You can now complete your overpass if you haven't already.




Time to build the off-ramps. Two tiles away from the edges of your loop ramps, plop road stubs to level the terrain and line it up with the avenue.
-An adjustment to your avenue's slope may be required for a future intersection. I've also left a pair of extra stubs near the avenue in this example so slip lanes can be added in the future.


Demolish your stubs and begin dragging RHW-2, wrapping it around your loop ramps.


Create a pair of ramp pieces from your RHW and connect them with your RHW-2s. Then re-drag your RHW-2s and they should override to MIS.
-Again, for this example I am using RHW-4 Type B ramps.


Plop a pair of MIS inner curves at the bends of your off-ramps to complete them.




Two ramps left to go. Drag avenue as displayed to set up the proper grade for them.


Demolish your avenues. In a mirrored fashion, plop another two avenue-MIS type B ramps just before your new intersections.


Drag the MIS from these ramps toward your RHW. Connect them with a RHW ramp piece.
-I am using RHW-4 type B ramps here as well, to keep it simple for this guide.


With your last ramps in place, your interchange is functionally complete. Use road stubs to level terrain around your interchange and demolish them when complete. This will improve the raw look of your new junction.


Congrats! You've constructed a realistic parclo 'A-4' interchange!




As stated above, these interchanges can include acceleration and deceleration lanes and can accommodate wider RHWs. Here's a decorated example with a RHW-8 with acceleration and deceleration lanes:


Anyways hope you found the guide useful! Making realistic-looking interchanges with the RHW mod is now better and easier than ever!

Offline Twyla

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Realistic Partial Cloverleaf AB Interchange (aka Texas Turnstile)
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2012, 05:52:54 PM »
Section 2.7: Realistic Par-Clo AB Interchange

The Folded Partial-Cloverleaf Interchange (aka ParClo AB Interchange) has the same functionality as any other Par-Clo (as well as most liabilities) - however, it has the advantage of consolidating both loops on the same side.  It is also known as a Texas Turnstile due to its prolific use in Texas and other States in the southwestern US (as well as the congestion generated by two intersections on the ground route).  Many cities and towns in this region boomed along rail lines during the 19th century, with their main thoroughfares running alongside the tracks.

Obviously, this severely limited the possibilities for interchanges, but the Folded Par-Clo proved to be an economical and relatively efficient solution.  Though not as efficient as many newer interchanges, the Folded Par-Clo remains a predominant choice in locations where half the usual footprint is unavailable for whatever reason - railroad tracks, landmarks, geology, or just crotchety old landowners with good lawyers.


STEP 1: Overpasses
Given the compact nature of the Partial Cloverleafs being used, we need the overpass to provide acceleration and deceleration lanes, so we'll use the RHW-6S Transitions.



STEP 2: On-ramps and Off-Ramps
Next, we plop a few RHW-6S Type E1 ramps like so.  Since we're being creative with our "deluxe interchange", we need the ramps on each side to be exactly three tiles from each other.



STEP 3: Swerving and Curving
Between each pair of ramps we plop an RHW-2 Type E1 Wye - be certain it's the RHW-2, which comes later in the loop than the RHW-4 version.  With our on/off traffic now consolidated to an RHW-2, we can use RHW-2 90-Degree Curves (Large) to direct our wayward motorists towards the roadway.



STEP 4: Tying Things Together
Connect the 90 curve to your roadway using the Road Tool, then repeat for the other intersection.



STEP 5: Tiptoe Through the TuLEPs
Although fully functional, this intersection is exceptionally blah.  Find the Avenue TuLEP-Type A1/Road TuLEP-Type A2 T-Intersection in the TuLEPS and plop one over the current intersection, then dress up the approaches with a few more TuLEPs.  Repeat for the other intersection.


If you like, you can spiff things up a bit further by adding Slip Lanes (also in the TuLEPs).



STEP 6: Being Shifty
With the ground connections done, we turn our attention back to the RHW portion.  Plop a few RHW-4S/6S transitions thusly to return traffic back to RHW-4S, making the acceleration lanes 2-3 tiles longer than the deceleration lanes (realism).



STEP 7: Buttoning Everything Together
Now use the RHW Tool to connect everything together and your Folded AB Par-Clo is now complete!  Happy motoring to all your Sims!

The interchange here is shown on a Small City Tile to better illustrate how small it's footprint is.



Deluxe Folded Par-Clo Interchange (aka Texas Turnstile) (NWM)
I call this a "Deluxe" interchange due to a few unusual 'tricks' used to make this interchange far tidier than most.  It also involves NAM's NWM, which is a separate mod from RHW - though many people use it, there are also a few conflicts.  Most of these deviations are quite simple and should prove easy for anyone to implement.


STEP 1: Minor Renovation
There are several instances where different mods (such as NWM and RHW) don't like each other.  Since we don't want the ugliness (or pathing disruption) which comes from failing overrides, we'll demolish four tiles of roadway (two spaces for the overpasses and one space to each side) and replace it with a Maxis Avenue.  (Besides, it's not like anyone will be making a left turn beneath the overpass.)  NWM quite tidily transitions the new Avenue back into the existing TLA-5 on its own.



STEP 2: Overpasses
Given the compact nature of the Partial Cloverleafs being used, we need the overpass to provide acceleration and deceleration lanes, so we'll use the RHW-6S Transitions.



STEP 3: On-ramps and Off-Ramps
Next, we plop a few RHW-6S Type E1 ramps like so.  Since we're being creative with our "deluxe interchange", we need the ramps on each side to be exactly three tiles from each other.



STEP 4: Swerving and Curving
Between each pair of ramps we plop an RHW-2 Type E1 Wye - be certain it's the RHW-2, which comes later in the loop than the RHW-4 version.  With our on/off traffic now consolidated to an RHW-2, we can use RHW-2 90-Degree Curves (Large) to direct our wayward motorists towards the roadway.



STEP 5: Tying Things Together
Connect the 90 curve to your roadway using the Road Tool, then plop a 3-lane Asymmetrical Road (ARD-3) Starter on it at the space indicated by the marker.  Delete ONLY the starter tile then reconnect with the 90 curve using the Road Tool.  Repeat for the other intersection.

Alternately, you can just plop a Road-to-ARD3 Transition against the RHW-2 90 Curve, but the technique above is a handy trick to learn when dealing with short stretches of NWM (or RHW) when the stability of overrides is an issue.


STEP 6: Tiptoe Through the TuLEPs
Conflicting overrides (look closely at the intersection above) result in an unusable intersection - fortunately, there's an easy fix.  Find the Avenue TuLEP-Type A1/Road TuLEP-Type A2 T-Intersection in the TuLEPS and plop one over the current intersection, then dress up the approaches with a few more TuLEPs.  Repeat for the other intersection.

NOTE: The addition of TuLEPS may disrupt the NWM overrides on the TLA-5.  If this happens, just plop the appropriate NWM starter in the same manner as the ARD-3 used in Step 5.


STEP 7: Being Shifty
With the ground connections done, we turn our attention back to the RHW portion.  Plop a few RHW-4S/6S transitions thusly to return traffic back to RHW-4S, making the acceleration lanes 2-3 tiles longer than the deceleration lanes (realism).



STEP 8: Buttoning Everything Together
Now use the RHW Tool to connect everything together and your Texas Turnstile (aka Folded Par-Clo) is now complete!  Happy motoring to all your Sims!

The above is a good 'starting point' for those who like to lay out their cities with realistic accuracy - and you'll find hundreds of these from Texas to Colorado to California.

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2012, 10:28:01 PM »
Section 2.8: Semi-Realistic Tight Parclo A-4 Interchange (Created by Haljackey)

This guide will take advantage of the TuLEP slip lane pieces to create a tight, somewhat realistic looking parclo A-4 interchange.

This kind of set up is great for players that want something that looks good without it taking up too much space. It exploits the fact that you can connect diagonal MIS ramps to the TuLEP slip lane pieces. No transition between the two exists, but it works when you connect them together.



For this example, I am using a RHW-6C, with small segments of RHW-8C intended for accel/decel lanes.


1. Drag out your RHW 6-C


2. Plop a pair of RHW-8C Type F ramps in a mirrored fashion with 4 tiles between the two of them like so:


3. Delete the road stubs and create your Avenue overpass in the centre. Drag avenue from the overpass in each direction.


4. Start to curve your MIS from the ramp pieces until they form a loop, and can intersect with the first tile of the avenue on each side of the overpass.


5. Plop a pair of Avenue Slip Lane Pieces (found near the end of the TuLEP tab cycle) where the MIS meets up with the avenue.


6. Plop a pair of Diagonal MIS filler pieces in the vacant space between the slip lane and the diagonal MIS.
-Yes I know it doesn't look quite like they connect, but trust me, the pathing's there.  ;)


7. Begin to drag some RHW-2 on the outside of the loop ramps and curve it around the loops like so:


8. Plop another pair of RHW-8C type F ramps at the ends and redraw the RHW-2 networks to change them to MIS.


9. Extend your MIS from your new intersections and curve it back towards the RHW. Create a short extension in the opposite direction so that it can intersect with the first tile of the avenue next to the intersection.


10. Plop another pair of RHW-8C type F ramps at the ends of the MIS so they connect with your RHW.


11. Once again plop a pair of Avenue slip lane pieces on each side of the intersections.


12. Delete the tile of MIS above the intersection and use diagonal MIS fillers to connect the MIS with the avenue slip lane.


13. Time to make your accel/decel lanes. Plop RHW 8C to 6C transitions where you want them:


13.1: For the centre part of the interchange, keep these transitions as close to the outer on-ramps as possible to maximize the length of the loop's acceleration lanes.




...And you're done! Congratulations, you've built a Tight Parclo A-4 Interchange with the use of TuLEP slip lanes!


Rotated view:


Link to an album of screenshots in case they aren't loading for you: http://imgur.com/a/ZoRDa

Anyways that will do it for now. I know the connections with the avenue don't look the best, but they sure get the job done with small amounts of space. Enjoy!
-Haljackey

Offline darxtar

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Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2012, 01:36:41 AM »
I've been enjoying these tutorials, thanks so much for the effort. I'm currently trying to recreate the interchange shown in Section 2.5: Parclo A-4 Interchange with single acceleration/deceleration ramps. Just to clarify, are the "MIS outer curves" the same as the "FAMIS-1>MIS-1 Short Outer Curve"?

Offline MandelSoft

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Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #10 on: October 12, 2012, 03:38:15 AM »
No. The "normal" outer curves are from orthagonal to diagonal, which is 45 degrees. The FAMIS-1>MIS-1 Short Outer Curve is only 22.5 degrees
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Offline darxtar

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Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2012, 04:11:35 AM »
Thanks for the prompt reply, MandelSoft. Much appreciated. Back to building interchanges  :thumbsup:

Offline Haljackey

Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2012, 12:23:11 PM »
Just to clarify, when I cay 'curve' or 'smooth curve', I imply the standard ortho-diag (or vice versa) 45 degree curve. If it's fractional angle, I won't call it a curve but rather just state that the piece you need is FARHW/FARMIS or whatever fractional angle transition piece is required.

Offline GDO29Anagram

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Re: Partial Cloverleaf Interchanges
« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2012, 03:02:43 PM »
Just to clarify, when I cay 'curve' or 'smooth curve', I imply the standard ortho-diag (or vice versa) 45 degree curve. If it's fractional angle, I won't call it a curve but rather just state that the piece you need is FARHW/FARMIS or whatever fractional angle transition piece is required.

Short curve and long curve come to mind. Short curve is the 18.4-deg curve piece, and long curve is the 71.6-deg curve piece. Short inner curve and short outer curve are much more descriptive for single-direction networks, assuming the FA network in question is at an angle of FA-3 (which it is).
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